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20130218
20130218
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attempts to prohibit the use of coffee and coca in the u.s. and around the world. mr. cortes describes secret deals made by top u.s. anti-drug official harry answer linger pushing to banco ca's use worldwide. this is a little over an hour. >> okay. um, and so tonight we are pleased to welcome ricardo cortes to discuss his latest book, "a secret history of coffee, coe that and cola: a tale of coffee, coca-cola, caffeine, secret formulas, special flavors, special favors and a future of prohibition." cortes is the creator and illustrator of a series of subversive books for all ages, for postally all ages about such things as marijuana, bombing and the jamaican bobsled team. his latest book examines a series of highly addictive substances that have caused many deaths and fueled much, much profit in this how they make their way into the u.s. and what the u.s. government's role has been in insuring that they come into this country, all right? and this evening we are pleased to be joined by two drug policy experts as well. its fellow sanho tree and colette that youngers. and without further a
to bases u.s. attacking their own personal try for their government? >> guest: you raised the third factor, with united states, the tribes now of the central government with a triangle of conflict that is the conflict said is often overlooked. would you include the central government than you know, it has its own relationship for some benefit and it is troubled earth these jurors south africa and asia you find this. if it is tolerant and open to give citizens the right they deserve to freedom or education but if it surprised -- suppresses but you have problems where you see the of brutalization and gadaffi with the triumphs saw the pattern exist and we looked at 40 case studies it is a global study of what is going on in the world. >> host: take pakistan and walked us through the different tribes. >> it is the essential piece of the study because waziristan is one of the most targeted places on earth. one of them most high and the tribal places an onerous never completely conquered it is part of pakistan but they maintain their own dependence with pride and tradition. the ordinary tribes
the world, to cheap cigars -- which the u.s. military tried to get away with giving him -- to arguments from his generals and to diet warnings and suggestions from his wife. these were largely ignored, especially the one that involved his eating only tomatoes. as i dug into all these materials, it became clear to me that for someone with churchill's great conversational skill and his ability to create a congenial setting, meals had an advantage over most kinds of meetings. they could be as long as he liked, and in the case of dinners, they could run into the wee hours when churchill gathered strength and others tired. his daughter, mary, reports that luncheon and dinner conversations often became so extended that meal times tended to prolong themselves far into the afternoon or evening with luncheons lasting sometimes until half past three. a typical evening, let's say, at checkers which is the prime minister's country house would begin at 8:30 with champagne in the drawing room. dinner would last from 9 to 10, 10:30, then cigars after the ladies were excused. when the men had rejoined the l
assassin," including his examination of the four people who have successfully assassinated u.s. presidents. it's about 40 minutes. >> so a couple, let me count it, one, two, three, four, five -- fourteen days ago in new york city we broke the guinness world record. we were trying to break the guinness world record for most secret decoder rings used in one place. that is the nerdest thing you can do with your -- nerdiest thing you can do with your time ever. we broke the record, it was great. nothing was nerdier except being in a bookstore on a friday night, people, okay? [laughter] so just, i pity all of us really, all of us. um, i want to say the most important thing of all. it will be, i promise, the most important thing i will say tonight, and that is thank you. everything i say after that will be straight downhill, and i'll tell you, i'll save some of the specific thank yous for the end. what we're here to talk about is "the fifth assassin," and people always say where do you get your ideas for books? i'll tell you about this store. because of dakota, no one gets crazier mail than me.
states serving life sentences for first-time truck offenses -- drug offenses. life sentences. the u.s. supreme court upheld life sentences for first-time drug offenders against an eighth amendment challenge that such sentences were cruel and unusual in violation of the eighth amendment, and the u.s. supreme court said, no, no, it's not cruel and unusual punishment to sentence a young man to life in imprisonment for a first-time drug offense even though virtually no other country in the world because such a thing. so we've got to end this idea that the criminals are them, not us. and instead say there but for the grace of god go i. all of us have made mistakes in our lives, taken wrong turns. but only some of us have been required to pay for those mistakes for the rest of our lives. in fact, president barack obama himself has admitted to more than a little bit of drug use in his lifetime. he's admitted to using marijuana and cocaine in his youth. and if he hadn't been raised by white grand parents in hawaii, if he hadn't done much of his illegal drug use on predominantly white college
the threat posed by guerrillas. the fact that the u.s. army and marine corps and other modern militaries including the french have to deal with the threat today is absolutely unsurprising. but i don't mean to suggest that absolutely nothing has changed over the course of the last 5,000 years. there have, in fact, been some significant changes. the biggest one has to do with the power of public opinion and propaganda. and this was something that was demonstrated in our very own war of independence. now, when we think of the american war of independence, we tend of think of battles like lexington and concord where the yankees slithered on their bellies and shot at the redcoats from behind trees and rocks in ways that the redcoats assumed to be ungentlemanly. now, these were, no doubt, effective tactics. but in the end what's striking to me about studying the american revolution is the extent to which it was decided not so much by what happened on the battlefield, but what actually happened in the house of parliament, in the commons in england. now, when you read conventional accounts, if i
billion u.s., ten trillion yen, 2.2% of gdp. a lot of that would go to infrastructure, a lot to the north to the earthquake area, but, of course, we've seen 14 such packages since the late 1990s. and this one has to be different. and also he's pressing the bank of japan. last time i was here was to introduce governor shirakawa several years ago who i think is a very good governor of one of the major central banks in the world, pressing him to put in more monetary stimulus which i think is necessary. but i, one of the points that was made right in this room several years ago by governor shirakawa, and i've been with him three times in the last two months, is, you know, monetary and fiscal stimulus aren't enough n. the case of japan, you need major deregulation. i think major structural reforms, deregulation in the service area. so, hopefully, that'll all flow into the package of the new prime minister. certainly, a tough job -- it's a tough job, but this is the world's third largest economy, and if we don't get japan moving with some of the other problems with europe, etc., i think the wor
been in all of this? where has the u.s. supreme court then? far from protecting the interests of discreet and insular minorities, far from doing that, the supreme court has been busy defending a war at every turn. the - u.s. supreme court over the last couple of decades has a disarrayed the protection against unreasonable searches and seizures granting to the police the authority to stop, chris, search just about anyone, anywhere, without any probable cause or reasonable suspicion not a shred of evidence of criminal activity as long as they get consent. now what is consent? it's when a police officer walks up to a young man. officer walks up to a young man with a hand on his gun and says to put your arms up in the air so i can see if you have anything on you. that young man just waved his fourth amendment rights against unreasonable searches and seizures law enforcement doesn't have to have a shred of evidence to support but not the young man has consented of course believing that he really had no ability to refuse consent and walk away. you might say these are just isolated i
against the apartheid in the u.s. complicity in helping to kind of prop up the government. eight days after 9/11, she joins harry belafonte and a number of civil rights activists to call for justice, not vengeance to decry any move to the war and insist that the united states work with an international law and in the international community to bring justice. so where do we go from here who? on the anniversary of the boycott last count, president obama had a picture of himself on the rosa parks thus setting in the rosa parks pos. as we know the post office will issue a stamp. she is as one of my colleagues put it the american version of the national st.. but her legacy asks much more about the statute. and if we are going to claim her legacy as president obama did last month, then we must realize what it asks of us. rosa parks courage was the ability to make an independent stand even though she and others had done that before and nothing had changed. even when she understood the harm to make those stands over and over throughout the course of her life, even when the civil rights moveme
had to prove the u.s. and iranian relationship which was undermined with the speech over the past 10 years. then you get the iraq war one of the unwinnable wars the united states thought it had to engage in. obama unfortunately comes in with very little background on foreign policy never paid much attention, is served in washington only two years i was enthusiastic supporter but those of us that looked at him knew it could be a problem and when he appointed secretary of state and secretary of defense for domestic reasons and appointed retired marine general as a national security adviser and put leon panetta, know he is a neighbor in california but captured by the mentality of the cia this was an extremely weak national security team and obama also was ruled by the military that is how you got the search of forces and i think he realizes he was had and that is important why i am a little more optimistic with the second turn this is a wiser man and with the the fact he ended the war in iraq and meandering toward the war in afghanistan allowing the of pentagon, an institution of the fi
-- mortality. what's interesting to study in u.s. sank in and one predictor of your life span now is your education. what's interesting about what we've done in health care, spending 18% over health care on health care, we have nothing left for social priority. all of which are likely to drive -- i'm not putting down the doctors. i'm appreciative of health care, but systemically this is bankrupting us in exposing us to a variety of problems that are really extreme. >> okay, just as a reminder we're on c-span so give your name and your affiliation and keep your question briefly so we can get to as many questions as possible. >> john, fox business. in my television simplistic way, so what's your solution? your wonderful speech, sounds like an argument for more consumer driven health care, more of a market, but i hear you're a single-payer guy spent i'm sort of a combination of extreme left and extreme right. i just like extremes. i think we need national health insurance, but i think it has to be defined as catastrophic. and i think interestingly what has to happen over time, we need to mak
to the constitution which abolished slavery in the u.s. jurisdiction these landmark documents of the freedom reside here at the national archives but they are filled with documents that tell the story of the emancipation of the individual level. the letter from a black soldier to the enslaved wife assures her there's a present national difficulties are great yet i look forward to a brighter day and the one asked president lincoln if she were signing the nitze push proclamation sadly the answer was no because she was in maryland, a border state unaffected by the decree. the first-person accounts of the slaves on sob files provide a window on to the world before and after the war. some talk of choosing a name tabare as a free person and others describe the long searches to reunite their families. milestones denied to and enslaved population, marriage, going to school now become popular for free people and our tremendous holdings that contains stories of the struggles and achievements. historians on the panel looked at the records and as other research institutions and the investigations we are lucky
, former mayor of atlanta and u.s. ambassador to the united nations andrew young and former justice department spokesman, terry adamson, in discussion of jack nelson's memoir, "scoop". the evolution of a southern reporter. it's about an hour. . . >> and for co-sponsoring it, and also the emory university woodruff libraries, particularly the manuscript, archives and rare books library which houses the papers and the wisdom of a great number of southern journalists; white, african-american, of all sorts. and we're so pleased that five of those are pulitzer prize winners, and the latest among them is jack nelson. barbara was so generous and has made jack's papers our possession now, and there's some rich, rich history in them. and i encourage everyone to go to marble and take a look at them. we're here tonight to celebrate the life, the memoir, the papers of jack nelson with some people who knew him extremely well. jack was a man of enormous influence and consequence in the nation. the story of jack nelson, for those who don't know, is the story of news reporting in the latter half of
Search Results 0 to 12 of about 13

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